Displaying items by tag: Organic

Children receive four times the exposure than an adult to at least eight widely used cancer-causing pesticides in food. The food choices you make now will impact your child’s health in the future.

 

One of the best markets in the state, Waldingfield attends this Saturday market at New havens Wooster Square all year round.  Even in the cold weather the crowds are usually large and the quality and range of the venders is unmatched by most markets in the region.

Waldingfield CSA - 2017

Thanks for enquiring about a CSA with Waldingfield.  We are happy to announce that our 2017 season signup is now open.   We have made some significant changes to our CSA model which we believe will put us, and you as members, in the best position for a fully realized CSA program for many seasons to come.  After 10 years without a price change to the half or full shares, we have decided that we will now offer a single share price.  The cost for a Waldingfield CSA share will be $600 - this is $30 value/week/over 20 weeks.  There is a multi tiered platform to pay for your CSA share - you can pay all at once, or after a deposit of $50 to secure your spot,  then make two payments to be spread out over time.

From the beginning we have always believed that a CSA was the driving force behind our success as a small organic farm.  For 20 weeks we provide weekly pick-ups and/or drop-offs for our clients comprised of what we have growing in the fields that particular week.  We have pick-ups at farmers markets  (New Haven, Sandy Hook, Washington Depot), and we also have drop spots (Redding, Weston).  Finally, we have pick-ups at  our farm stand on East Street in Washington.    Email us with any questions you have - This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Pick up locations:

New Haven -  Saturday - @ Wooster Square Farmers Market 9am -1pm 
Washington Depot - Saturday  - 10am to 1pm
Redding/Weston - Saturday - 10am to 10:30 pm
Sandy Hook -  @ Fairfield Hills Campus -  Tuesday 2pm-6pm
Waldingfield's Farm Stand  - Friday 4:30pm -6pm & Saturdays 2pm-5pm
Brooklyn (TBD) 
 

Starting in June and lasting through October, the weekly offerings range in size and variety as the seasons progress.  Some spring item examples may include  a variety of lettuces, snap peas, cooking greens, radishes and other early root crops.  The summer  months bring the bulk of the variety we grow at the farm, from squash and zuc's, cuc's and tomatoes (we grow the best around) as well as numerous greens, beans, leeks, peppers, eggplants, etc. Our fall harvest typically includes late season summer crops and hearty fare like winter squash, potatoes, apples,  kales, turnips, beets, etc.  While we cannot guarantee that everything planted will survive to harvest, we do know that we offer a wide variety for your tables all season long. 

As most people who join CSA's know, the money we take in helps the farm operate all season long, even when there is no produce to be harvested.  It pays for seed in the winter months, start up costs in the spring, labor to plant the first crops, and most importantly it allows the farmers to focus on growing instead of marketing the harvest.  It is sharing the risk in what we do, and the reward is some of the best organic food in CT.  So think about it. Does this work for you and your family?  We understand in today's society that many people wish to participate in the local food system and that joining a CSA is a great way to ensure that farms stay in your area. Thanks!

 

Advantages for farmers:

  • Get to spend time marketing the food early in the year, before the long days in the field begin
  • Receive payment early in the season, which helps with the farm's cash flow
  • The farmers have opportunity to get to know the people who eat the food they grow

Advantages for consumers:

  • Eat ultra-fresh food, with all the flavor and vitamin benefits
  • Get exposed to new vegetables and new ways of cooking
  • Usually get to visit the farm at least once a season
  • Find that kids typically favor food from "their" farm – even veggies they've never been known to eat
  • Develop a relationship with the farmer who grows their food and learn more about how food is grow

 

A nice piece by a Litchfield County Blog "HappeningintheHills.com" 

Nice, pictures, too!

http://happeninginthehills.com/onourradar/p-proven-q-quality/

The fields are raining tomatoes and in the distance the sunflowers dance like an agrarian Martha Graham piece.  This is simply the best time to be at the farm despite the fact that most of the crew has left for school, and the days are all of a sudden extremely long, and the energy level required to start each day seems unattainable.  And yet they do, and we are all the better for it.  It’s a small group of strong backed bucks, led by the quiet fortitude of JB, and each of these men (DJ and JDP in particular) have become one with the farm.  They know the daily movements of the place, the pace and the tone, and bring their passions to the fields each day. As one might say, they have skin in the game, and any employer would be proud to have these fella’s on their team. 

So the Heirloom tomatoes finally came after a long wait.  Their glorious colors and flavors are what we wait all year, and they are now heaping over the sides of the CSA pick-ups and our market stall.  We will soon make our 2014 sauces, crushed tomatoes, and bloody mary mix, but for now we are enjoying the acidic delights of these beauties.  

However, we are not simply about tomatoes in September.  The fields are full of many wonderful crops like arugula, salad mix, Asian greens, fingerling potatoes, radishes, daikon, summer squash, green beans, kales, swiss chard and that’s just summer fare.  Soon the broccoli, winter squashes, root crops like carrots, beets and turnips will spring forth from the fields and onto the plates of CSA and market shoppers from Litchfield to Brooklyn!  So sweet…

Many people have commented that Waldingfield appears to be having its best season ever.  Well, it is a little too early to say for sure, but all indications point to record harvests in all crops across the board (except tomatoes – which while we still plant a lot of them, have been reduced in recent years to allow for more attention to other crops). Through strong planning, committed CSA members and loyal shoppers at our markets, we should continue to see our revenue grow.

September has just the right mix of warm days and cool nights, and despite the ridiculously hot start to the month, seems to be settling in for a nice autumn.  Rain season may still yet come but our fields are in terrific shape thanks to the crew, and we are bullish for an amazing mid fall harvest. 

Thanks for the support.  

The fields are raining tomatoes and in the distance the sunflowers dance like an agrarian Martha Graham piece.  This is simply the best time to be at the farm despite the fact that most of the crew has left for school, and the days are all of a sudden extremely long, and the energy level required to start each day seems unattainable.  And yet they do, and we are all the better for it.  It’s a small group of strong backed bucks, led by the quiet fortitude of JB, and each of these men (DJ and JDP in particular) have become one with the farm.  They know the daily movements of the place, the pace and the tone, and bring their passions to the fields each day. As one might say, they have skin in the game, and any employer would be proud to have these fella’s on their team. 

So the Heirloom tomatoes finally came after a long wait.  Their glorious colors and flavors are what we wait for all year, and they are now heaping over the sides of the CSA pick-ups and our market stall.  We will soon make our 2014 sauces, crushed tomatoes, and bloody mary mix, but for now we are enjoying the acidic delights of these beauties.  

However, we are not simply about tomatoes in September.  The fields are full of many wonderful crops like arugula, salad mix, Asian greens, fingerling potatoes, radishes, daikon, summer squash, green beans, kales, swiss chard and that’s just summer fare.  Soon the broccoli, winter squashes, root crops like carrots, beets and turnips will spring forth from the fields and onto the plates of CSA and market shoppers from Litchfield to Brooklyn!  So sweet…

Many people have commented that Waldingfield appears to be having its best season ever.  Well, it is a little too early to say for sure, but all indications point to record harvests in all crops across the board (except tomatoes – which while we still plant a lot of them, have been reduced in recent years to allow for more attention to other crops). Through strong planning, committed CSA members and loyal shoppers at our markets, we should continue to see our revenue grow.

September has just the right mix of warm days and cool nights, and despite the ridiculously hot start to the month, seems to be settling in for a nice autumn.  Rain season may still yet come but our fields are in terrific shape thanks to the crew, and we are bullish for an amazing mid fall harvest. 

Thanks for the support.  

As we wind down the twenty fifth year farming here in the hills of Litchfield County, it never fails to amaze us at how lucky we are to call this place home.  The land is beautiful, to be sure, but what makes it even more so is the devotion and care that those men and women who oversee the farms daily operation bestow upon the operation.  Tireless in their approach to farming, always learning, and always looking for ways to improve the bottom line, it is a joy to work with such a spirited team.  Alas, it is only now, as winter sets in that the daily hum of the place comes to a slow murmer, and we miss the larger crew of summer.  There is work to be done, always, but the fields are now far more quiet then just a month ago.  It was a record year for us on every level,  the CSA program grew in size for the fourth year running (and will do so again in 2015), market revenues hit all time highs (back in September, no less, and the year is not yet over), and we increeased our yields per acre in just about every crop.  We were rolling by early May and didn't really slow down till mid November.

The unusual early snow and chilling temperatures that arrived last month, and the far shorter work days, have not completely taken the fields out of play, however.  We still have beautiful broccoli and kale outside, as well as greens growing in the high tunnel.  The main barn has winter squash, turnips, and potatoes, some other root crops, too, all awaiting the two winter markest we will attend in Decemember and through the spring ( they are at Wooster Square in New Haven on Saturdays, and in Coventry on Sundays).  We will also have plenty of our tomato products available, as well , and our honey and maple syrup.  We grow all year round at the farm now, and the two new high tunnels we received from an NRCS grant last month will help us to be able to run our CSA throughout the year starting in 2015/2016.  This is very exciting for us and we cannot wait to get the new tunnels into production.

There are a few names to give special "shout outs" to before closing up for the season. First and formost, our fearless farm manager, Jed Borken.  Just five years ago this mild mannered lawyer from Minnesota was clerking for a judge in Westchester.  Now, after what seems like an accelerated farming MBA course load, he has overseen the growth of the farms revenue stream by over 100% since his arrival.  We could not have done this without him.  Second on the list are the "core four" - Dana Jackson, Will O'Meara, Jason DePecol, and John Charles.  This group of farmers nailed it in every way this season.  From seeding and planting, from farmers markets to tractor and field work, these guys are farmers in the first degree.  And it makes us proud that more then one of them will pursue their dreams of farmeing their own land in the years to come.  Until then, they are invaluable to our success.  Of course the summer crew were extremely important, too. They were green in knowledge but long on effort, and were led by returning verteran Lindsay Jenkinson. They are in no real order; Ethan, Hiller, Anastasia, Sacha, Madison - who deserves special mention for running the Kent market most of the season, Hanah, Ava, Lucky-Dawg (too briefly), Charles, Reilly, and Margot.  Lastly, are two guys who bookended the year: Lyle " Nickles" Nichols and Tom Armstrong.  The former is now in Nepal seeking his fortune as a minerals prospector (actually Peace Corps), and he was a huge asset in the spring start up..  He brought some much needed humor to the daily activities with his killer stand up routine, as well.  The latter, a Kiwi from the south island, came to us via the Borkens.  Living in the new barn, this farming mercenary arrived in the fall just as the main crew were returning back to school.  He was without a doubt the best visiting farmer we have ever had the pleasure of working with.   We hope he comes back in the spring after heading to San Diego and crushing the winter pro surfung tour.

So there you have it.  A record year and one that will springboard us to better things in 2015.  Thanks for the support.  We love what we do and want to do it for another twenty five years.  Hope you will come along for the ride.

Cheers.

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