Month: March 2011

Tomatoes

Tomatoes

The tomato, the love apple, the fruit of the gods…. As you can tell, we love our tomatoes! Each year we try to introduce new varieties to the menu but we also make sure to always have the classics.  Brandywine, Green Zebra, Cherokee. The tomato […]

Zucchini

Zucchini

We grow a variety of zucchini here the farm, and they are not only delicious, they are tremendously versatile. We love to sauté the flowers with oil and garlic or throw them on the grill. We have zucchini squash in green, yello, even purple!  Yeah!

Winter Squash

Winter Squash

Sample image

Waldingfield always has a strong winter squash crop.  Durable, delicious, and remarkably varied, we look to have it available all fall and deep into each winter season.

(more…)

Beets

Beets

Beets are one crop we will be focusing on more carefully in 2012.  some swear they have healing powers. Who knew?

Beans

Beans

We grow a number of bean varieties on the farm. As you know, they’re good for your heart.!

Patrick Horan

Patrick Horan

Patrick (owner) has been full-time since 2006. Prior to that (he was a part-time farmer from 1996-2006)where he worked in finance at R.G. Niederhoffer Capital Management, a New York City hedge fund, while also pursuing acting. He is a graduate of Union College (B.A. English) and The Stella Adler Conservatory (MFA program). He is responsible for all marketing, sales, and general operations, as well handling daily farming duties when on the farm.

Patrick also works with older brother Daniel at Five Acre Farms, Inc., based in Brooklyn (NY), where he is head of logistics.  Five Acre Farms is a brand that markets local milk, eggs, and apple products from the qwerty Northeast.  www.fiveacrefarms.com

He and wife and son, Suzie and Griffin, divide their time between Brooklyn, NY, and Washington. CT.

(more…)

Quincy Horan

Quincy Horan

Q (co-owner) has been at the farm since the first season back in 1990.  His passion for growing organic food most likely came from his stint out west attending Pitzer College, from which he received a B.A. in History.  While this passion continues to consume […]

Jed Borken

Jed Borken

Jed came to Waldingfield in the spring of 2010 and quickly proved to be the missing link in our business/farm operations. Today he  is the farm’s Manager.  Originally from the midwest, Jed earned his JD from Seattle University School of Law before relocating to the […]

CSA  Program

CSA Program

Waldingfield CSA – 2017

Thanks for enquiring about a CSA with Waldingfield. We are happy to announce that our 2017 season signup is now open.   We have made some significant changes to our CSA model which we believe will put us, and you as members, in the best position for a fully realized CSA program for many seasons to come.  After 10 years without a price change to the half or full shares, we have decided that we will now offer a single share price.  The cost for a Waldingfield CSA share will be $600 – this is $30 value/week/over 20 weeks.  There is a multi tiered platform to pay for your CSA share – you can pay all at once, or after a deposit of $50 to secure your spot,  then make two payments to be spread out over time.

From the beginning we have always believed that a CSA was the driving force behind our success as a small organic farm.  For 20 weeks we provide weekly pick-ups and/or drop-offs for our clients comprised of what we have growing in the fields that particular week.  We have pick-ups at farmers markets  (New Haven, Sandy Hook, Washington Depot), and we also have drop spots (Redding, Weston).  Finally, we have pick-ups at  our farm stand on East Street in Washington.    Email us with any questions you have – info@waldingfieldfarm.com

Pick up locations:

New Haven –  Saturday – @ Wooster Square Farmers Market 9am -1pm 
Washington Depot – Saturday  – 10am to 1pm
Redding/Weston – Saturday – 10am to 10:30 pm
Sandy Hook –  @ Fairfield Hills Campus –  Tuesday 2pm-6pm
Waldingfield’s Farm Stand  – Friday 4:30pm -6pm & Saturdays 2pm-5pm
Brooklyn (TBD) 
 

Starting in June and lasting through October, the weekly offerings range in size and variety as the seasons progress.  Some spring item examples may include  a variety of lettuces, snap peas, cooking greens, radishes and other early root crops.  The summer  months bring the bulk of the variety we grow at the farm, from squash and zuc’s, cuc’s and tomatoes (we grow the best around) as well as numerous greens, beans, leeks, peppers, eggplants, etc. Our fall harvest typically includes late season summer crops and hearty fare like winter squash, potatoes, apples,  kales, turnips, beets, etc.  While we cannot guarantee that everything planted will survive to harvest, we do know that we offer a wide variety for your tables all season long. 

As most people who join CSA’s know, the money we take in helps the farm operate all season long, even when there is no produce to be harvested.  It pays for seed in the winter months, start up costs in the spring, labor to plant the first crops, and most importantly it allows the farmers to focus on growing instead of marketing the harvest.  It is sharing the risk in what we do, and the reward is some of the best organic food in CT.  So think about it. Does this work for you and your family?  We understand in today’s society that many people wish to participate in the local food system and that joining a CSA is a great way to ensure that farms stay in your area. Thanks!

 

Advantages for farmers:

  • Get to spend time marketing the food early in the year, before the long days in the field begin
  • Receive payment early in the season, which helps with the farm’s cash flow
  • The farmers have opportunity to get to know the people who eat the food they grow

Advantages for consumers:

  • Eat ultra-fresh food, with all the flavor and vitamin benefits
  • Get exposed to new vegetables and new ways of cooking
  • Usually get to visit the farm at least once a season
  • Find that kids typically favor food from “their” farm – even veggies they’ve never been known to eat
  • Develop a relationship with the farmer who grows their food and learn more about how food is grow

 

Protect Future Generations

Protect Future Generations

Children receive four times the exposure than an adult to at least eight widely used cancer-causing pesticides in food. The food choices you make now will impact your child’s health in the future.